His Words

What we don’t know, he knows—you know?

I recently read that human knowledge is now doubling every 12-13 months. How can we even wrap our heads around that fact (unless our heads are growing at the same rate)? Think of it…next year at this time, we’ll have twice the data to sort through! Where are we going to put all those new facts and findings? At some point won’t “the cloud” come crashing down on…

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Her Words

How to survive an empty-nested New Year

Over-indulging in holiday anticipation makes for one wicked emotional hangover. Three weeks ago, we were enjoying a long-awaited, pre-Christmas trip to Dallas with our sons, full of shopping, eating, and movie-watching wonder. Even though it was only a quick getaway, there was no post-trip let down. We still had the prospect of 10 more days of rich family bonding. All the…

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His Words

Why the world needs more cookies

She was worked up. She’d called our cellphones during the night at least eight or nine times. How is it that a frail, 88 year-old woman is able to pace anxiously about her room without ever leaving her chair? Yet there she was, and that’s what she was doing. She was jittery. Antsy. Nervously picking at everything within arm’s reach. “What’s wrong, Mom?”…

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His Words

Coming down to earth at the holidays

Advent is the shortened form of the Latin word adventus. It means “coming.” What a perfect name for this season. Everything is coming at us during the holidays. Colder weather comes, usually. Calendar craziness always comes—on consecutive nights it’s possible to have a play, a party, a performance, a pageant, then another party. Each weekend brings the arrival of better doorbuster sales and bigger blockbuster movies. That end-of-the-year letter from your…

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Her Words

Why it’s okay to cry into your eggnog

December 2, 2015  My inner Scrooge had just poured a scotch and pushed “Play” on all the reasons to feel glum. But leave it to a selfless foster mom, some prayer requests for cancer-riddled friends, and Sarah McLachlan crooning over one-eyed homeless dogs, to put the ultimate buzz kill on my “me”-soaked drunk.

His Words

What to do when you wake up in a Flannery O’Connor novel

A friend in one of the helping professions once told me, “I would absolutely love my job…if it weren’t for the people.” Then he laughed. (Only later did it dawn on me that his laugh didn’t mean, “I made a funny joke!” It meant, “I just said a true thing and what’s funny is that you think I was joking.”)…

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Her Words

How not to be a butt while turning the other cheek

The Holidays are upon us…turkeys, trees, and togetherness. But because two of our beds left with Walter when he moved in February, ’tis also the season for the Woodses to do some jolly ‘ol refurnishing. After much research, Len ordered one of those new-fangled, highly-reviewed beds from the young upstart company, Tuft & Needle. Our queen-size mattress arrived shrink wrapped in…

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His Words

Talk is cheap (until it costs a fortune)

We are a race of yakkers. Exactly how much we talk is unclear. One oft-cited experiment put the average at 20,000 words daily for women and 7,000 for men. A separate study of college students in 2007 reported numbers more like 16,000 for females and 15,000 for males. Precise figures depend on a variety of factors—culture, gender and age of the speaker, context (coffee shop or library?), time of…

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Her Words

How to do life with a peek-a-boo God

Nothing pleases me more than discovering someone crazier than I. (It’s nice to have a target of deflection when Len and I begin questioning our choice to live by the seat of our professional and financial pants.) A couple of weeks ago, Len had coffee with Will Stagg. Will graduated from Louisiana Tech in 2013 with a degree in Family and…

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Her Words

Redeeming the stories of tiny super heroes

With Halloween right around the corner, I am reminded of one of my favorite costumes from one of my favorite movies. Having lost her street clothes, To Kill a Mockingbird‘s Scout is forced to walk home from the school play through the darkened streets of Maycomb, AL, wearing her large papier-mâché ham.